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A view of Dzialoszyce about 1922 depicted on a postcard.
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According to the Polish pamphlet,. "Fifty Years of the Voluntary Fire Brigade of Dzialoszyce", published in 1958, Dzialoszyce developed from a gamekeeper's village established almost a thousand years ago. The village was founded where two tributaries of the river Nidzica meet in the middle of a forest. As it grew, its position on the high road to Krakow probably helped attract new townspeople.

Jews were first allowed to settle in Dzialoszyce during the reign of Casimir the Great in the middle of the 14th century. The Jewish population thrived, with most being involved in crafts and commerce. Originally, the town was part of Krakow Province, but was annexed to Pinczow district after the Partition of Poland. By 1820, there were 1692 people living in Dzialoszyce and about 75% were Jews. In 1921, the population was 6765 and was about 83% Jewish.

From the end of the 18th century until the end of World War I, Poland did not exist as a country, but was partitioned among the Russian, German and Austrian empires. Under Russian rule in the 19th century, Dzialoszyce was part of Kielce guberniya. This is the time frame we are able to search for family records.
Copyright Susan Javinsky, 2001
Dzialoszyce, Poland

formerly a Jewish shtetl in Kielce guberniya,
now a town in the county of Pinczow, province of Swietokrzyskie
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